We remain open to provide care for your pets. We are following the direction of government and regulatory authorities and have implemented hospital and visit protocols to keep both you and our team safe. For regular updates on our hours and visit protocols, please follow our social media platforms.

Retained Puppy (Deciduous) Teeth

A deciduous (puppy) pet tooth is considered retained as soon as the permanent (adult) tooth erupts. The permanent pet tooth does not need to be fully erupted for the deciduous to be considered retained.

Cause of retained deciduous (puppy) teeth

The most common cause for a deciduous tooth to be persistent is the adult tooth erupted incorrectly. This will result in the deciduous tooth staying in the mouth and the permanent tooth coming in alongside. This is contrary to the classic but mistaken belief that a retained deciduous tooth causes the permanent tooth to erupt in an unnatural position.

Appearance

This is most common in toy and small breed dogs but can occur in any breed as well as cats.  The most common teeth affected are the canines, followed by the incisors, and premolars; and it typically happens on both sides. The oral exam will reveal additional teeth in the arcades, which often appear crowded. In addition, the adult teeth are typically moved into an abnormal position.

Unfortunately, this unnatural position may cause tooth or gum trauma leading to possible infections of teeth or even the nose.   Studies have shown these orthodontic problems can occur within 2 weeks after the adult teeth come in.  In addition to orthodontic consequences, periodontal problems also occur with retained deciduous teeth. This is due to the adult and puppy tooth being crowded together. The abnormal anatomy results in a weakened periodontal attachment and increased susceptibility to future periodontal (gum) disease.  This is even more concerning given the fact that the patients who tend to retain teeth (toy and small breeds) are also more prone to periodontal disease.

Treatment for retained deciduous teeth

There should never be two teeth of the same type in the same place at the same time.

Therefore, any persistent deciduous teeth should be extracted as early as possible.  You should examine your pet’s mouth at least once a week or have your veterinarian take a look to ensure the prompt removal of these teeth.

The extraction of deciduous pet teeth can be very difficult due to the considerable length and thin walls of the deciduous tooth. Resorption of the retained deciduous tooth can also compromise the extraction. Dental x-rays can provide information which allows the veterinarian to remove the toothless invasively. In some cases, the root may be completely resorbed, making the extraction simple.

Written by: College Manor Veterinary Hospital

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COVID-19: Additional measures we are taking

Dear Clients,

Due to the close contact that our work requires, we have taken additional measures to protect you and our team while providing care for your furry family members.

Last updated: Tuesday, May 19, 2020

1. We are currently operating a “closed waiting room” policy to protect our clients and staff. When you arrive, please remain in your vehicle and use your cell phone to call us at 905.853.4706. We will take a history from outside of your vehicle, and bring your pet into the clinic for an examination with the veterinarian. We will then return to your vehicle with your pet to discuss our recommended treatment plan.

2. We can now see all cases by appointment only.

3. We are still OPEN with the following hours:
Monday - Wednesday: 9:00 am - 7:00 pm
Thursday: 9:00 am - 6:00 pm
Friday: 9:00 am - 4:00 pm
Saturday: 9:00am - 1:00pm
Sunday: Closed

4. If you are ordering food or medications, please allow 2-4 business days as our suppliers are dealing with increased demand and are trying to fill orders as quickly as possible. We will advise you as soon as your order arrives. Please call us when you arrive to pick up your order, but do not enter the hospital. Our staff will bring your order to your car and take payment over the phone.

You can also use our online store and have your food delivered directly to your home. To sign up, visit our website.

Note: Due to the continued health precautions recommended by Health Canada, we have elected to discontinue 'in clinic' pick-ups for items ordered via our Webstore including both medications and food with immediate effect. The delivery option is extremely flexible and they will deliver to your place of work, home, cottage or wherever you choose.

5. For the time being, we are not accepting cash as payment. Credit cards and debit card payments are still available.

6. Online consultations are now available! If you wish to connect with a veterinarian via message, phone or video, visit our website and follow the "Online Consultation" link.

Following the recommendations of our government and medical experts, we are doing our best to practice social distancing within the constraints of our roles. As such, we have taken measures to avoid both contracting and facilitating the spread of this virus.

Thank you for helping us be diligent for everyone's safety. As we have heard from all levels of government, the situation is fluid and any updates will be provided as changes occur.

Your dedicated team at College Manor Veterinary Hospital